A Blogging Break

I apologize for being somewhat sporadic with posts lately. It has been a busy season as we have been transitioning from one church building to another. I’m going to take a two-week hiatus from the blog in order to devote needed time to this transition. I’ll plan to post some new content during the week of October 9-14.

Until then, enjoy this video from Lutheran Satire about a Christian and a feminist almost agreeing on stuff:

Covenantal Typology: A Proposal

Often times, when we discuss types in Scripture, we may assume that an Old Testament type passes away when the New Testament antitype brings it to fulfillment. Often times, this is the case. Here are some examples:

  • The Old Testament Levitical priesthood has now passed away. It pointed us forward to Christ, who is now our permanent high priest in the order of Melchizedek (see Hebrews 7). Fulfillment requires the passing away of the type.
  • The Old Testament sacrificial system has now passed away. It pointed us forward to Christ, who is now our permanent sacrifice (see Hebrews 10). Again, fulfillment requires the passing away of the type.
  • The Old Testament holy places (tabernacle, then temple) have now passed away. Jesus is the true Temple, the new covenant locus of God’s presence with us. Fulfillment requires the passing away of the type.

Continue reading

We Have Passed a Threshold

As Western culture’s faith in the Triune God has receded, our sexual ethic has been completely transformed. Whereas heterosexual marriage used to be a clearly defined parameter for sexual intimacy, now our only rule seems to be “Do no harm.” As long as all parties involved are consenting adults, the sexual behavior has the blessing–or will soon have it, once we mature beyond our “yuck” impulses–of our culture. Continue reading

A New (to Me) Argument for Premillennialism

I’m preaching through the book of Daniel, and I came across a few verses in chapter 7 that seem to cohere best with a premillennial theology, and these are verses that I personally don’t remember ever seeing brought into the discussion of eschatology models.

Daniel 7 is an account of Daniel’s vision of four beasts who emerge from the sea: a lion with wings, a bear with three ribs in its mouth, a four-headed, four-winged leopard, and an unidentified, terrifying fourth beast with ten horns, from which emerges a little horn different from the others. My understanding of these beasts is that they represent successive human kings/kingdoms (see vv. 17, 23), pictured as horrifying beasts in order to demonstrate the horror of human rebellion against God. Continue reading